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Tough to Handicap

The technical landscape is very ambiguous this week. Not only is it a short week, but we’re already at ‘over sold’ levels by many measures.

Typically you’d look for a market bounce in over-sold conditions. If so, the 2874 level (50-day-moving-average) would be the place to look. However, given the ongoing trade issues with China, the markets could be going through a more material overhaul of future profit expectations. If this is the case, there could be more pain before markets find traction.

The 2800 level is likely the key for the week. So far, this support level has managed to hold up. As long as the market can close above this level it’s a good sign. However, a close below this level — and, more significantly, a close at the end of the week/month below this level — would likely be greeted by additional downside.

The fact this is a holiday-shortened week falling at the end of the month may make for some interesting movement on volume.

The challenge looking forward is figuring out what could drive growth from here. With the trade war potentially handicapping future profits for a large portion of the markets, the stage is set for a sideways grind. The stage does not seem set for a 50% decline (at least not yet), but it does not seem set for a big push higher from these levels either.

Perhaps we will look back and wish we had ‘sold in May and went away.’ Then again, the total market decline has only been about 4% or so for the month. The bigger concern is the bleed in ‘long’ positions in the BigFoot database. We’ve gone from over 80% long signals to now below 60% long signals. This may simply be a reflection of the spike in volatility. Then again, it could be a sign of something more.

Frankly, this trade war with China is on the verge of becoming a very real issue. This kind of event can lead to structural changes in our economy. Those changes are yet unknown. But we can likely expect the technical aspects of the market will shoot first and ask questions later. Stay tuned…

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION

Please remember that past performance may not be indicative of future results. Different types of investments involve varying degrees of risk, and there can be no assurance that the future performance of any specific investment, investment strategy, or product (including the investments and/or investment strategies recommended or undertaken by BigFoot), or any non-investment related content, made reference to directly or indirectly in this blog will be profitable, equal any corresponding indicated historical performance level(s), be suitable for your portfolio or individual situation, or prove successful. Due to various factors, including changing market conditions and/or applicable laws, the content may no longer be reflective of current opinions or positions. Moreover, you should not assume that any discussion or information contained in this blog serves as the receipt of, or as a substitute for, personalized investment advice from BigFoot. To the extent that a reader has any questions regarding the applicability of any specific issue discussed above to his/her individual situation, he/she is encouraged to consult with the professional advisor of his/her choosing. BigFoot is neither a law firm nor a certified public accounting firm and no portion of the blog content should be construed as legal or accounting advice. A copy of the BigFoot’s current written disclosure statement discussing our advisory services and fees is available for review upon request.

Thin Air

The SPX is in a difficult spot. On the one hand, momentum in the smaller-cap stocks looks questionable; prices are above monthly trend; and earnings season has many concerned growth may be waning.

On the other hand, the prior intra-day high of just over 2940 is within striking distance.

So which way does the market go?

This is a tough call given that things seem pretty fairly valued at these levels. If you’re looking for a clear catalyst that drives equities higher, we may not know it until after the market has already placed its bets.

Markets aren’t in the business of sitting around and waiting for all the data to materialize. Often times they place their bets. Last week may have been an indicator as prices climbed while volumes dwindled.

Futures have indicated a fairly mixed open.

The trick looking forward is that the technical signals are mixed. At this point, the SPX is sitting atop a trend looking for a direction. Do we break out higher or retrace?

A healthy move for this market (SPX) would be to pull back to the 2860/2800 level the reverse to push on to new highs. What appears more likely is a move to take out the 2940 highs, followed by an even tougher decision about whether or not things should move higher from there.

The air is getting pretty thin at these levels. Markets seem to have moved higher not because of the news but because of a lack of reason for the trend to break. This makes things more fragile. A negative announcement could trigger the next 10% pull-back. But that doesn’t seem to be the prerogative of the markets lately. Given the now tired adage of TINA (there is no alternative), it appears the probability the SPX crosses the 3000 level this calendar year is still pretty likely.

SPX for the week

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION

Please remember that past performance may not be indicative of future results. Different types of investments involve varying degrees of risk, and there can be no assurance that the future performance of any specific investment, investment strategy, or product (including the investments and/or investment strategies recommended or undertaken by BigFoot), or any non-investment related content, made reference to directly or indirectly in this blog will be profitable, equal any corresponding indicated historical performance level(s), be suitable for your portfolio or individual situation, or prove successful. Due to various factors, including changing market conditions and/or applicable laws, the content may no longer be reflective of current opinions or positions. Moreover, you should not assume that any discussion or information contained in this blog serves as the receipt of, or as a substitute for, personalized investment advice from BigFoot. To the extent that a reader has any questions regarding the applicability of any specific issue discussed above to his/her individual situation, he/she is encouraged to consult with the professional advisor of his/her choosing. BigFoot is neither a law firm nor a certified public accounting firm and no portion of the blog content should be construed as legal or accounting advice. A copy of the BigFoot’s current written disclosure statement discussing our advisory services and fees is available for review upon request.

No Man’s Land

If you’re looking for some kind of directional indication from the short-term, the markets aren’t hearing it.

Since the Christmas Eve lows of last year, this market has been on a tear… until the last two weeks or so. Now it seems escape velocity is waning. Each time the SPX hits 2800 momentum seems to dry up.

After last week’s negative move the 200-day moving average is back on the menu. The question is, will it be support or resistance?

Given the earnings season is largely behind us, the markets now get to shift to economic reports and politics. But don’t be fooled – the real story remains the FOMC. As long as the cheap money remains in play, there’s little reason for investors to go elsewhere for returns.

Technical signals are pretty benign here. The upside momentum may be washing out, but there’s no significant downside to speak of yet either. This leaves us with a few key support levels in the short-term: 2742; 2722; and 2679.

To translate this into percentages, there’s about a 2.5% downside risk this week (according to technicals). There’s a similar amount of upside. Looks like we’re range-bound in the short-term until the market gets some news to confirm a directional break-out. So far, 2800 continues to be resistance.

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION

Please remember that past performance may not be indicative of future results. Different types of investments involve varying degrees of risk, and there can be no assurance that the future performance of any specific investment, investment strategy, or product (including the investments and/or investment strategies recommended or undertaken by BigFoot), or any non-investment related content, made reference to directly or indirectly in this blog will be profitable, equal any corresponding indicated historical performance level(s), be suitable for your portfolio or individual situation, or prove successful. Due to various factors, including changing market conditions and/or applicable laws, the content may no longer be reflective of current opinions or positions. Moreover, you should not assume that any discussion or information contained in this blog serves as the receipt of, or as a substitute for, personalized investment advice from BigFoot. To the extent that a reader has any questions regarding the applicability of any specific issue discussed above to his/her individual situation, he/she is encouraged to consult with the professional advisor of his/her choosing. BigFoot is neither a law firm nor a certified public accounting firm and no portion of the blog content should be construed as legal or accounting advice. A copy of the BigFoot’s current written disclosure statement discussing our advisory services and fees is available for review upon request.



New Year’s Shift

Happy New Year!

This is the first full week of trading for the year – so back to work!

Markets are trying to shake off the December 2018 hangover. Last week’s first trading week sure made it interesting. The big news was the blowout jobs report last Friday coupled with the more Dovish tones from the Fed. This cocktail was the recipe for a huge rally on Friday.

Has this changed anything? Only the short-term outlook. It seems everyone had written off the economy for dead in December. With the Fed tightening, it was only a matter of time before the recession word came into play. But then the jobs numbers came out.

Realistically, the problems are unchanged from last year. The difference is outlook on the Fed. If the money supply isn’t going to be choked off even more aggressively (because, remember, they’re still reducing their balance sheet and no longer buying bonds), perhaps the economy can continue to grow.

Plus the American public is about to get a very real look at whether or not they will experience personal tax savings under this new plan. It’s been a popular target because of growing deficits at the Federal level, but folks are about to get a direct taste of ‘what’s in it for me.’

Some good news on China talks, the Federal government starts operating again (this is less of a concern to the market than the media would have you believe), and some decent earnings numbers and guidance in Q1 and this market could be back on track in short order.

The Fed shifts to more hawkish, trade talks with China drag on with no change, or we start to see numbers indicating an actual economic slowdown, and this market could head south all over again.

So for now, we wait a couple weeks and see how the data shapes up.

If you want to be a stickler, the SPX actually hit a 20% drop from peak-to-trough during December. So one could argue we’ve had the shortest bear market we’ve ever seen. Strangely, no one seems to be saying that. The talking heads keep talking about when the bull will die… so apparently an intra-day swing, or a one-day blip, isn’t how they want to measure things.

For the week, it look for 2408 support, and really no upside resistance to speak of, so 2575/2600. If this seems like a comically large range for a technical call… it is. But that’s what happens when you’ve had the kind of volatility that wrapped up last year. Things get blown-out, over-sold, and the algo’s get a little wild. Until volatility subsides (if), this may be typical for a while.

Cheers and fingers crossed for a great 2019!

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION

Please remember that past performance may not be indicative of future results. Different
types of investments involve varying degrees of risk, and there can be no assurance
that the future performance of any specific investment, investment strategy, or product
(including the investments and/or investment strategies recommended or undertaken by
BigFoot), or any non-investment related content, made reference to directly or indirectly
in this blog will be profitable, equal any corresponding indicated historical performance
level(s), be suitable for your portfolio or individual situation, or prove successful. Due
to various factors, including changing market conditions and/or applicable laws, the
content may no longer be reflective of current opinions or positions. Moreover, you
should not assume that any discussion or information contained in this blog serves as the
receipt of, or as a substitute for, personalized investment advice from BigFoot. To the
extent that a reader has any questions regarding the applicability of any specific issue
discussed above to his/her individual situation, he/she is encouraged to consult with the
professional advisor of his/her choosing. BigFoot is neither a law firm nor a certified
public accounting firm and no portion of the blog content should be construed as legal
or accounting advice. A copy of the BigFoot’s current written disclosure statement
discussing our advisory services and fees is available for review upon request.

Retrenchment

Thank you Veterans.

And for the rest of us market jocks, what’s the scoop for the week?  Look for retrenchment above SPX 2750.  In fact, look for 2800 this week as markets seek to find footing.

While the 200-day moving average should form some support, futures trading has been eradic over the weekend.   At first, futures showed a higher open.  But things swung to the downside as Europe opened and oil prices pushed higher.

This kind of pricing behavior is not necessarily predictive of anything other than folks repositioning over the weekend.  And since the range for the repositioning was relatively narrow, it may simply be noise.  Given last week’s strong move higher — after a 10% correction for most indexes — and a ‘nearly’ completed election — it looks like the markets are poised to start reclaiming some of their last ground from October.

One of the growing concerns is in the housing market.  Keep an eye on that in the coming months.  While stocks remain attractive relative to everything else, the housing market slow-down may be a sign that this almost-10-year economic expansion is feeling the affects of higher interest rates more than folks may care to admit.

It may sound funny, because mortgage rates in the 5’s are still historically low.  But, compared to mortgage rates in the 3’s, they’re some 30% higher than they used to be.  For folks that have never known higher borrowing costs in their lives (save credit cards), this could be a legitimate point of contention.

As a housing market aside, it’s going to be very interesting to follow what comes out of the massive forest first in California.  Not only has there been loss of life.  There’s been massive loss of property (which may actually be stimulative for the housing market).  There’s been massive strain on infrastructure.  And it’s called to the forefront some of the questionable Federal forest management policy that’s lead to these massive fires.  (Admittedly, this is something personal for me as the Pacific Northwest experiences fires every summer.  However, with only 4 million or so people in Oregon, there are not enough votes to seem to move the needle much in Washington.  But have this happen in California, and now we have your attention.)  Federal changes in forest management could potentially unlock a lot of value in timber.  If this were to happen, the housing markets would need to be reexamined.

Look for some early volatility this week as markets find their footing.  As long as the SPX stays above 1750 or so a recovery trend is still probable.  A close below this level and we’ll have to reconsider whether the Santa Clause rally is really coming to town.

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION

Please remember that past performance may not be indicative of future results. Different
types of investments involve varying degrees of risk, and there can be no assurance
that the future performance of any specific investment, investment strategy, or product
(including the investments and/or investment strategies recommended or undertaken by
BigFoot), or any non-investment related content, made reference to directly or indirectly
in this blog will be profitable, equal any corresponding indicated historical performance
level(s), be suitable for your portfolio or individual situation, or prove successful. Due
to various factors, including changing market conditions and/or applicable laws, the
content may no longer be reflective of current opinions or positions. Moreover, you
should not assume that any discussion or information contained in this blog serves as the
receipt of, or as a substitute for, personalized investment advice from BigFoot. To the
extent that a reader has any questions regarding the applicability of any specific issue
discussed above to his/her individual situation, he/she is encouraged to consult with the
professional advisor of his/her choosing. BigFoot is neither a law firm nor a certified
public accounting firm and no portion of the blog content should be construed as legal
or accounting advice. A copy of the BigFoot’s current written disclosure statement
discussing our advisory services and fees is available for review upon request.

Within Striking Distance

Now that the SPX has closed above 2800 it’s within striking distance of re-taking the 2018 highs up near 2870.  Crazy enough, this could happen quite quickly.  Economic data is light this week so eyes are on earnings.  Absent a black swan event, the stage is set for this market to go higher.

That’s really the summary.  The rest of the news about trade wars and international relations is so badly misrepresented by partisan media outlets that markets have about tuned them out completely.  Unless policy actually changes — or missiles start getting lobbed at countries — it seems this market is about over the finger pointing.  It’s getting back to a more normalized ‘results’ driven analysis, with the Fed’s monetary policy now taking a partner roll to economic data rather than being the primary driver.

The SPX is a bit over-bought at this point — and least by the numbers — so a pull-back of 25ish points is not out of the cards.  But the bigger technical up-trend remains intact at this time.

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION

Please remember that past performance may not be indicative of future results. Different
types of investments involve varying degrees of risk, and there can be no assurance
that the future performance of any specific investment, investment strategy, or product
(including the investments and/or investment strategies recommended or undertaken by
BigFoot), or any non-investment related content, made reference to directly or indirectly
in this blog will be profitable, equal any corresponding indicated historical performance
level(s), be suitable for your portfolio or individual situation, or prove successful. Due
to various factors, including changing market conditions and/or applicable laws, the
content may no longer be reflective of current opinions or positions. Moreover, you
should not assume that any discussion or information contained in this blog serves as the
receipt of, or as a substitute for, personalized investment advice from BigFoot. To the
extent that a reader has any questions regarding the applicability of any specific issue
discussed above to his/her individual situation, he/she is encouraged to consult with the
professional advisor of his/her choosing. BigFoot is neither a law firm nor a certified
public accounting firm and no portion of the blog content should be construed as legal
or accounting advice. A copy of the BigFoot’s current written disclosure statement
discussing our advisory services and fees is available for review upon request.

Now the Stock Markets Can Start July

True, there was some pretty strong jobs data and a reassurance from the FOMC last week that rates aren’t going to go rocketing higher any time soon.  Still, the 4th of July holiday fell on a Wednesday, and Tuesday was a shortened day.  PLUS, it was the beginning of the 3rd quarter.  What does this all add up to?  Vacations – for lots of the major market players.  That’s why last week’s market movement needs to be taken with a grain of salt.

It’s not that the data didn’t matter.  It’s that fewer participants were around to adjust to it.  If the futures are any indicator though, folks liked what they saw last week.  The SPX is poised to move another third of a percent or so higher (if the futures are right).  And the technical pattern showed a pretty solid reversal at 50-day moving average (just above the 2700 support level).

In spite of all the tariff and trade war talk, the markets continue to produce strong earnings.  Even without multiple expansion this is a recipe for higher stock prices.  And that seems to be what’s in store right now.

For the week, look for 2800 to be the resistance area to watch on the SPX.  Or, more specifically, 2771 and 2788 as pit-stops on the climb to re-take 2800.  Regardless, the stage is set.  If this week can produce a climb higher, it’s likely the January highs will be soon to follow.  If for some reason the SPX manages to close below 2700, then we’re still stuck in the sideways trade (or worse) — but that seems like a low probability at this point.

As an aside, those who watch the DJIA as a key indicator may be disappointed for a time.  With the recent turnover in holdings — and the market’s infatuation with tech — this index has been in opposition to a lot of major market trends this year.  In the BigFoot database, it’s the only major index that has a wait signal associated with it.  Otherwise, most signals have re-entered the market.  So keep that little tid-bit in the back of your mind.  The non-financial mega-caps have not been the best performers of 2018.

As another aside, financials as a block have seem to struggle a lot recently as well.  This may be a key week for them, given that, as a sector, they’ve experienced a greater-than-10% correction for the year.  This could prove an interesting technical re-entry point (though don’t misconstrue this as a recommendation to buy – it’s merely a commentary that the sector may be nearing a technical low-point).

For the week, look for a positive bias to the SPX, with 2800 being the next major resistance area to test.

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION

Please remember that past performance may not be indicative of future results. Different
types of investments involve varying degrees of risk, and there can be no assurance
that the future performance of any specific investment, investment strategy, or product
(including the investments and/or investment strategies recommended or undertaken by
BigFoot), or any non-investment related content, made reference to directly or indirectly
in this blog will be profitable, equal any corresponding indicated historical performance
level(s), be suitable for your portfolio or individual situation, or prove successful. Due
to various factors, including changing market conditions and/or applicable laws, the
content may no longer be reflective of current opinions or positions. Moreover, you
should not assume that any discussion or information contained in this blog serves as the
receipt of, or as a substitute for, personalized investment advice from BigFoot. To the
extent that a reader has any questions regarding the applicability of any specific issue
discussed above to his/her individual situation, he/she is encouraged to consult with the
professional advisor of his/her choosing. BigFoot is neither a law firm nor a certified
public accounting firm and no portion of the blog content should be construed as legal
or accounting advice. A copy of the BigFoot’s current written disclosure statement
discussing our advisory services and fees is available for review upon request.

Will the 200-day Moving Average Hold Support for the SPX?

Last Friday’s market fail was technically disappointing as a the week ended lower.  The 200-day moving average (currently at 2593) barely held up.  In fact, it was breached intraday last week.

The technical set-up is now in messy territory.  On a day-over-day basis, it looks like the 200-day moving average is holding up as support.  However, on a week-over-week basis, the data is less conclusive.

It appears a significant area of support is setting up at the 2585 level.  That was the previous low mark in the current pull-back.  It is also barely above the 2582, which is the current tipping point for the Market Macro Indicator.

While the futures markets have been higher over the weekend, the talk about trade wars continues to escalate.  It seems unlikely both China and the US would cut their noses off (economically speaking) to spite their face.  So this is likely more about rhetoric and negotiation posturing.  But it’s certainly got the markets spooked.

More importantly, the futures markets seem to do little to point out the future these days.  Other than confirming the immediate trend in the markets — and perhaps providing some insight into the extreme highs and lows in the trading day — there seems to be less correlation between the futures and the market than in prior months.  So take the data with a grain of salt.

The 200-day moving average appears to be the place to watch.  If that holds, it looks like a trading range between 2600 or so on the downside, and 2700 on the upside until earnings season gets rockin’ in another week or two.  If earnings continue to shine, the uptrend can resume (as long as tariff talks moderate).  If not…   well, let’s not borrow trouble just yet.

For now, the algo database has shaved another point off, dropping to 28% long.  The marcro’s are holding steady and remain long.  One thing’s for sure, it ain’t boring!

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION

Please remember that past performance may not be indicative of future results. Different
types of investments involve varying degrees of risk, and there can be no assurance
that the future performance of any specific investment, investment strategy, or product
(including the investments and/or investment strategies recommended or undertaken by
BigFoot), or any non-investment related content, made reference to directly or indirectly
in this blog will be profitable, equal any corresponding indicated historical performance
level(s), be suitable for your portfolio or individual situation, or prove successful. Due
to various factors, including changing market conditions and/or applicable laws, the
content may no longer be reflective of current opinions or positions. Moreover, you
should not assume that any discussion or information contained in this blog serves as the
receipt of, or as a substitute for, personalized investment advice from BigFoot. To the
extent that a reader has any questions regarding the applicability of any specific issue
discussed above to his/her individual situation, he/she is encouraged to consult with the
professional advisor of his/her choosing. BigFoot is neither a law firm nor a certified
public accounting firm and no portion of the blog content should be construed as legal
or accounting advice. A copy of the BigFoot’s current written disclosure statement
discussing our advisory services and fees is available for review upon request.

Is it Finally Bad Enough?

Q1-2018 is officially in the books — and what a frustration.  January came in like a bull, but February and March went out like bears.  In the end, there was a lot more volatility, but investors haven’t moved the needle much in terms of account values.

The theme has been a mixed bag of good and bad…  the economic data looks so good that the Fed has to tighten monetary policy.  Taxes are going down, but tariffs are going up.  It’s like each piece of good data has a corresponding bad piece.  You know what they call that?  A market!

While the talking heads sort out the news stories of the day, the underlying technical data has its own story to tell.  Last week the 200-day moving average appears to have held support — in the final week of the quarter — in a shortened trading week.  The S&P500 also touched it’s 10% pull-back mark again.

Early indications are that the consolidation trend may be finding a base at these levels.  If so, we could be looking at another leg higher in equities.  Consider that markets appear technically oversold, and that corporate earnings continue to climb, and the underlying data doesn’t appear things are going to collapse.  Corporate balance sheets — and mega-bank balance sheets, for that matter — look nothing like they did in 2008.

This may sound optimistic.  And, admittedly, it’s too early to call this one.  But it seems wise to bias toward the strong underlying economic data over the shorter-term headlines risks of this market.  Plus, a look at the Sigma/BigFoot database shows we’re at a very low-point in terms of the percent-long for overall positions, but the macro-indicators are all positive.  This is yet another sign we may be reaching a point where the volatility and turnover in the equity market is going to start swinging the other direction.

This Thursday’s conference call should be a fun one!

So far this year…

For the week…

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION

Please remember that past performance may not be indicative of future results. Different
types of investments involve varying degrees of risk, and there can be no assurance
that the future performance of any specific investment, investment strategy, or product
(including the investments and/or investment strategies recommended or undertaken by
BigFoot), or any non-investment related content, made reference to directly or indirectly
in this blog will be profitable, equal any corresponding indicated historical performance
level(s), be suitable for your portfolio or individual situation, or prove successful. Due
to various factors, including changing market conditions and/or applicable laws, the
content may no longer be reflective of current opinions or positions. Moreover, you
should not assume that any discussion or information contained in this blog serves as the
receipt of, or as a substitute for, personalized investment advice from BigFoot. To the
extent that a reader has any questions regarding the applicability of any specific issue
discussed above to his/her individual situation, he/she is encouraged to consult with the
professional advisor of his/her choosing. BigFoot is neither a law firm nor a certified
public accounting firm and no portion of the blog content should be construed as legal
or accounting advice. A copy of the BigFoot’s current written disclosure statement
discussing our advisory services and fees is available for review upon request.

50-dma Fail

If the futures markets are any indicator, then it looks like the 50-day moving average for the SPX is going to fail on Monday morning.  While this is not in and of itself a catastrophic sign, it’s disappointing as the recovery wave of this trend may be failing.  Intra-day the SPX managed to publish both a higher high and higher low for last week.  Still, the Monday open appears to be pretty sloppy.  It looks like about a 0.5% drop out of the gate.  And, if history is any indicator of how things will go, we could see follow-through on the trend that moves the trend even lower.

With the open dropping below the 50-day moving average (at 2748), the nest line in the sand will be 2700 — or the 100-day moving average at 2685.

Even if the markets test the 2685-support range this week, it does not mean the bull market is officially ‘dead’ or anything drastic.  The speed and aggressiveness of how the market seeks this level could come into play though.  A very aggressive drop this week could spook investors.  If so, we may be looking at a re-test of the market lows, and a more material correction period.

More likely, the markets will continue to be volatile, and we’ll trade in a sideways pattern with a point range between 1700 and 1850 for a while until some kind of shift in economic data gives investors a reason to commit more seriously to a direction.  Until then, it’s the an obnoxious Goldilocks market — neither too hot nor too cold to break out of a sideways trend.

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION

Please remember that past performance may not be indicative of future results. Different
types of investments involve varying degrees of risk, and there can be no assurance
that the future performance of any specific investment, investment strategy, or product
(including the investments and/or investment strategies recommended or undertaken by
BigFoot), or any non-investment related content, made reference to directly or indirectly
in this blog will be profitable, equal any corresponding indicated historical performance
level(s), be suitable for your portfolio or individual situation, or prove successful. Due
to various factors, including changing market conditions and/or applicable laws, the
content may no longer be reflective of current opinions or positions. Moreover, you
should not assume that any discussion or information contained in this blog serves as the
receipt of, or as a substitute for, personalized investment advice from BigFoot. To the
extent that a reader has any questions regarding the applicability of any specific issue
discussed above to his/her individual situation, he/she is encouraged to consult with the
professional advisor of his/her choosing. BigFoot is neither a law firm nor a certified
public accounting firm and no portion of the blog content should be construed as legal
or accounting advice. A copy of the BigFoot’s current written disclosure statement
discussing our advisory services and fees is available for review upon request.