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Tricks, Not Treats

Apparently the markets were in the Halloween spirit last night and decided to play a trick on us, dropping close to six percent across the board. Ouch!

This massive spike in volatility has blown up a lot of technical patterns. September started the mess with more than a 10 percent pull-back from peak to trough prices. From September 24th to October 12th the S&P 500 began the climb out of the slide, nearly recovering all of September’s losses.

Those last two weeks though. Yikes. The SPX gave up all the nearly all of the gains to re-test the September lows… and although the intra-day lows didn’t quite dip lower, this trend is anything but over.

This week is likely to be messy. Only the boldest of analysts would try to call anything this week. And that is probably more bravado than skill, as the data is all over the board.

And, of course, there’s another tiny little detail we’re watching (where is the sarcasm font when you need it?): the election.

It’s entirely probable the election will not be decided this week. Across the country there are legal battles over the deadline for mail-in ballots and how they should be counted. Any close race in a key battleground state is likely to be met with lawsuits.

With this much unknown it is silly to try and call the outcome. History has show that polling data is not meaningful enough to get a good handicap on an election. And covid has changed the way we vote. In some areas its reported that mail-in ballots have exceeded total ballots cast in 2016. So, who knows?

Given the radical uncertainty this week, to call it a sideways pattern is a cop-out. But to put numbers to this seems equally silly. The ‘support’ level for the SPX is at the 200-day moving average, down at 3129… that’s over four percent lower than Friday’s close. Resistance is an equally silly number, up at the 50-day moving average at 3402, over four percent higher that Friday’s close.

So, plus or minus four percent… it sounds outlandish, but those are the numbers. It shows just how tough it is to handicap this market in the short-term (especially given an election during a pandemic in the midst of government lockdowns, stimulus, and quantitative easing).

So, for the week, the professional advice is: hang in there. This could be a wild ride.

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION

Please remember that past performance may not be indicative of future results. Different types of investments involve varying degrees of risk, and there can be no assurance that the future performance of any specific investment, investment strategy, or product (including the investments and/or investment strategies recommended or undertaken by BigFoot), or any non-investment related content, made reference to directly or indirectly in this blog will be profitable, equal any corresponding indicated historical performance level(s), be suitable for your portfolio or individual situation, or prove successful. Due to various factors, including changing market conditions and/or applicable laws, the content may no longer be reflective of current opinions or positions. Moreover, you should not assume that any discussion or information contained in this blog serves as the receipt of, or as a substitute for, personalized investment advice from BigFoot. To the extent that a reader has any questions regarding the applicability of any specific issue discussed above to his/her individual situation, he/she is encouraged to consult with the professional advisor of his/her choosing. BigFoot is neither a law firm nor a certified public accounting firm and no portion of the blog content should be construed as legal or accounting advice. A copy of the BigFoot’s current written disclosure statement discussing our advisory services and fees is available for review upon request.

“Free” the Markets

As suggested last week, markets appear to be finding their footing. In fact, with last week’s close above trend, the S&P 500 may be looking to re-take its all-time highs in the next week or two. The question is why?

Aren’t we staring at an election year? Odds makers have Biden winning. Isn’t that a vote for a massive (and expensive) tax overhaul that will stifle the markets?

Maybe… but not yet.

In the short term… as in, the next few days… markets are betting on more stimulus. After all, FREE money means we don’t have real economic problems to deal with (there is no sarcasm font so you’ll have to read between the lines on this comment.) IF they’re right, it’s short-term lighter fluid on the stock market. Well, sort of.

A new round of stimulus probably bumps the markets to all-time highs, but the bump may be short-lived as the stimulus is sort of being baked into the prices already. Then we have to consider the ‘next’ thing the markets are going to think about, which is the possible tax fallout of a Biden win.

The POTUS probably isn’t the biggest concern. The Senate is. If it flips blue, the checks and balances that exist in the system stand to flip too. So a lot more extreme jockeying can take place.

Political opinion aside, the blue side of the aisle is on record as being in favor of higher corporate and personal taxes. A significant tax hike on either group, at least so far, does not appear priced into the markets. So you can do the math: new taxes, new headwinds… even in a TINA market.

Since investors are (rightfully) incapable of handicapping the outcome of the upcoming election, time horizons have shifted pretty short-term. So volatility is likely. And the tug-of-war will between fear of the upcoming election (FOTUE) and fear of missing out (FOMO).

For the week, looking for a continuation of last week. This means a close for the S&P 500 above 3523 will signal a re-test of the all-time highs for the index. Support is at 3419. And, given last week’s nearly 4% climb higher, it’s possible the index will challenge its all-time highs this week.

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION

Please remember that past performance may not be indicative of future results. Different types of investments involve varying degrees of risk, and there can be no assurance that the future performance of any specific investment, investment strategy, or product (including the investments and/or investment strategies recommended or undertaken by BigFoot), or any non-investment related content, made reference to directly or indirectly in this blog will be profitable, equal any corresponding indicated historical performance level(s), be suitable for your portfolio or individual situation, or prove successful. Due to various factors, including changing market conditions and/or applicable laws, the content may no longer be reflective of current opinions or positions. Moreover, you should not assume that any discussion or information contained in this blog serves as the receipt of, or as a substitute for, personalized investment advice from BigFoot. To the extent that a reader has any questions regarding the applicability of any specific issue discussed above to his/her individual situation, he/she is encouraged to consult with the professional advisor of his/her choosing. BigFoot is neither a law firm nor a certified public accounting firm and no portion of the blog content should be construed as legal or accounting advice. A copy of the BigFoot’s current written disclosure statement discussing our advisory services and fees is available for review upon request.

Reading Between the Lines

Reading the headlines you’d assume the markets were gearing for a collapse. After all, just about ever superstitious thing you can think of is lining up. It’s a month before elections, there are protests (and riots) all over the place, hurricanes – POTUS even got Covid.

A look under the hood at the BigFoot Database is similarly concerning. The total percent long for the database is now under 42%. That’s slightly more than a 50% reduction off peak numbers that crested 84% long.

The NASDAQ and the S&P 500 both have sell signals. The DJIA just tripped a wait signals.

All three major indexes dipped into correction territory in September.

And, of course, there are all the structural problems in education and the economic supply chain resulting from Covid shut-downs.

So things have gotta be bad, right?

Well, yeah… but that doesn’t mean the stock market has to go down.

This week there is a key technical area for the S&P 500 to watch: 3427. .. or if you want to split hairs, 3426.96. This was the closing price for the index on September 4th, just two days after the markets had set new all-time highs then aggressively sold off.

If the SPX manages to close above this key level any time this week, it would likely signal a re-test of the all-time highs for the index.

It may seem counter-intuitive, but keep in mind the stock market is a forward looking mechanism that is trying to handicap the future. In that respect, it is already looking as far ahead as it can – including past the election. So what we’re really looking for is a signal that expectations are going to change.

The technical data, so far, does not indicate those changes. In fact, the price movement seems to be consolidating around the current levels. Futures have indicated a positive open for Monday, and it appears the momentum is shifting back toward the up-side.

Even the BigFoot Database, while negative, is in a fairly extreme condition. Remember, part of what triggers a sell signal in the system is a negative volatility spike. If volatility drops, those signals will stabilize and potentially flip back to the buy side.

So keep an eye on 3427 on the S&P 500. That is the critical resistance area for the week. Support should show up at 3323. And, if trends hold, volatility could actually decline (again, counter-intuitive in this media cycle, but a possibility nonetheless).

In the FWIW, the President having Covid is probably less of an event than the media has let on too. We will discuss more about this in our upcoming forum call this Thursday. Catch you there… (and if you’re not on the list and would like to join the call, ping us at customerservice@bigfootinvestments.com and we’ll get you a link).

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION

Please remember that past performance may not be indicative of future results. Different types of investments involve varying degrees of risk, and there can be no assurance that the future performance of any specific investment, investment strategy, or product (including the investments and/or investment strategies recommended or undertaken by BigFoot), or any non-investment related content, made reference to directly or indirectly in this blog will be profitable, equal any corresponding indicated historical performance level(s), be suitable for your portfolio or individual situation, or prove successful. Due to various factors, including changing market conditions and/or applicable laws, the content may no longer be reflective of current opinions or positions. Moreover, you should not assume that any discussion or information contained in this blog serves as the receipt of, or as a substitute for, personalized investment advice from BigFoot. To the extent that a reader has any questions regarding the applicability of any specific issue discussed above to his/her individual situation, he/she is encouraged to consult with the professional advisor of his/her choosing. BigFoot is neither a law firm nor a certified public accounting firm and no portion of the blog content should be construed as legal or accounting advice. A copy of the BigFoot’s current written disclosure statement discussing our advisory services and fees is available for review upon request.

Were Bears Just Invited to Dinner?

Let’s cut through the fluff and get right to the meat and potatoes of the market – did last week’s sell-off after the Trump Tweet announcing more China tariffs represent the end of the road for the bull market?

Too early to call. But judging from the futures markets, the balance has been upset. It looks like more than a 1.5% pull-back is on the horizon for the open today.

At this point, the markets — and the SPX specifically — would be best to stay above the June pull-back lows near 2725. That leaves some additional room to decline, as futures imply an open around 2875 or so today.

The challenge is in the economic data. With earnings still rolling along, but guidance still cautious, and the Fed lowering rates on eroding data — plus the rest of the world’s central banks already at lows — the ‘race to the bottom’ for rates could be accelerating. If that happens, it will get harder to stave off deflation.

Markets know this. After all, if 10-year money only yields 2%, how much up-side is expected in the long term? The problem is, the markets also know there’s been nowhere else to find yield, so the blue chips have been the ‘risk’ asset folks seem to have flocked to to extract yield. At some point, this riskier play may come back to haunt.

While it’s not yet time to worry, it’s time to be ‘on alert.’ The concern is that many investors have been watching for a signal that the bull is dead. The same investors that were forced into the market seeking yield may be the ones that get nervous and exit just as quickly. If so, we could see risk re-price quickly.

When do the bond substitute-ers run for the door? Who knows? But if risk is truly mispriced, when they do run for the door, the markets should notice.

The new issue that comes with the question is, how long before the bear trumpets become a self-fulfilling prophecy? At some point, every prior bull market has come to an end. Most believe this will be the case again. But how to recognize it?

The concern comes in how quickly sentiment seems to be shifting. Markets have been climbing a wall of worry for months – maybe even years now. Those little naysayer voices are getting louder though. At some point, what starts as a pull-back will become an actual bear event. Call me crazy, but I think the place to watch right now is those blue chips – the same mega-caps that have carried the index to all-time highs while masking the underlying weakness in small and mid-caps may be the very tell-tail that markets are turning.

Before you let your emotions get the best of you though, consider this: the trend is not broken, and every other pull-back this year has been similarly violent.

The issue is, there really isn’t any ‘new’ information that justifies panic. Trade is still an issue, rates are still super low, and TINA is still forcing yield-seekers into higher risk assets. The Fed has also maintained its commitment to as much transparency as it can muster, all but showing us the hand they’re holding as they make policy. So there’s not an issue of transparency. There’s simply a question of when will investor sentiment shift enough to move markets into bear territory?

If you have the answer, by all means, share. Otherwise, we’ll just have to stick with the data and the key numbers. This week, the SPX will likely open around 2875 or so. The week could get ugly though. If the market doesn’t find a bid, the 200-day moving average may be in sight in the next couple of weeks. That’s down around 2790.

The “Oh Crap” level is below 2744 or so. This would indicate a close below the June lows. It would also be a ‘lower low’ in the pricing pattern. While it’s unlikely the markets will fall that low this week, it’s a number to keep in the back of your mind. A breach of this level — or the intra-day lows of 2728.81 — would be a bearish signal. At that point, the SPX is likely to go into office correction territory. We’ll take a deeper dive in this blog should those events occur.

For now, look for a rougher week in the markets — or certainly a rough Monday. The BF database is still over 77% long, but we can expect that will shift over the week should volatility continue over the next few days.

This is a normal part of markets. Not every day goes up. And we’ve been spoiled with low volatility for a few years now. It’s often important to remind ourselves of this. Keep perspective – investing is long-term, and this is all part of a market. This is also where opportunities are born. So we’ll be keeping our eyes open.

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION

Please remember that past performance may not be indicative of future results. Different types of investments involve varying degrees of risk, and there can be no assurance that the future performance of any specific investment, investment strategy, or product (including the investments and/or investment strategies recommended or undertaken by BigFoot), or any non-investment related content, made reference to directly or indirectly in this blog will be profitable, equal any corresponding indicated historical performance level(s), be suitable for your portfolio or individual situation, or prove successful. Due to various factors, including changing market conditions and/or applicable laws, the content may no longer be reflective of current opinions or positions. Moreover, you should not assume that any discussion or information contained in this blog serves as the receipt of, or as a substitute for, personalized investment advice from BigFoot. To the extent that a reader has any questions regarding the applicability of any specific issue discussed above to his/her individual situation, he/she is encouraged to consult with the professional advisor of his/her choosing. BigFoot is neither a law firm nor a certified public accounting firm and no portion of the blog content should be construed as legal or accounting advice. A copy of the BigFoot’s current written disclosure statement discussing our advisory services and fees is available for review upon request.

Here Comes Earnings Season

The stage is set for an exciting earnings season. Guidance is one thing, but this is where the rubber to meet the road. Can earnings actually grow from here? Or have we seen peak earnings growth for this economic cycle?

It may not matter… yet. The Fed has all but assured markets a rate cut is coming. So there’s little incentive to run for the fixed income markets. There really aren’t a lot of options for investors to find yield — or any returns for that matter — outside of select real estate markets or equities markets. So a multiple-expansion rally is not out of the question at this point.

The funny thing is, while the fundamental story driving this market higher has not changed, the technical picture has become a mixed bag for the S&P 500. The rather orderly expansion continues to behave calmly as the day-over-day pricing break new highs. In fact, five of the last six trading weeks have finished positive.

But there’s more to the story than just printing higher highs. The SPX is above it’s 50, 100, and 200-day moving averages. And it’s now more than 1.5 standard deviations above its 21-day trading average. By those figures, this market is over-bought.

So which is it? Orderly or over-bought? Perhaps both. The thing is, despite being over-bought, there does not seem to be significant pressure for a price correction. Now that 3000 has been breached, the index will need to test this level to see if it will maintain support. Otherwise, a pull-back toward the 2940/50 level would be fairly typical based on the pricing pattern unfolding.

The upside, while possibly breaking out, appears to be around the 3035 level for the week. If this level is breached, a run for 3050 is certainly possible. But given the over-bought nature of the market, it would take some pretty good earnings news to push things that quickly while we’re already at all-time highs.

Should a downdraft materialize, look for the 3000 level to be the first test. A breach of this level is not exactly a problem. It could just mean a test of the 50-day moving average, or somewhere down near 2900 is even possible. This does not negate the current up-trend. It would be a fairly orderly and typical round of profit taking to see this kind of price move. Should the 100-day moving average be pierced then it may be worth taking a closer look at pricing.

For the week, look for the bias to be positive, with some volatility increasing as earnings season gets under way. As long as expectations are met and guidance is reasonable, the 3100 level is still within sight in the next few weeks. If sentiment turns, we will re-evaluate at that time.

Meanwhile, the BigFoot database continues to be around 78% long. This should remain stable as long as volatility remains low.

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION

Please remember that past performance may not be indicative of future results. Different types of investments involve varying degrees of risk, and there can be no assurance that the future performance of any specific investment, investment strategy, or product (including the investments and/or investment strategies recommended or undertaken by BigFoot), or any non-investment related content, made reference to directly or indirectly in this blog will be profitable, equal any corresponding indicated historical performance level(s), be suitable for your portfolio or individual situation, or prove successful. Due to various factors, including changing market conditions and/or applicable laws, the content may no longer be reflective of current opinions or positions. Moreover, you should not assume that any discussion or information contained in this blog serves as the receipt of, or as a substitute for, personalized investment advice from BigFoot. To the extent that a reader has any questions regarding the applicability of any specific issue discussed above to his/her individual situation, he/she is encouraged to consult with the professional advisor of his/her choosing. BigFoot is neither a law firm nor a certified public accounting firm and no portion of the blog content should be construed as legal or accounting advice. A copy of the BigFoot’s current written disclosure statement discussing our advisory services and fees is available for review upon request.

S&P500 Enters Over-Bought Territory

Last week was another strong showing for the SPX in 2019.  In fact, so far, there have only been 3 negatives closes for the year.  The last time we saw the markets start this strong was… oh yeah, last year.  Then, in February, everything tanked.

This is not to say that everything is gearing up to tank again.  But it is to say the markets may be getting out ahead of themselves a bit.

Perhaps the biggest difference between 2018 and 2019 is where the markets have been.  After 2017’s strong upward move, the markets were still pushing higher.  After 2018’s late-year collapse, the markets are still recovering.

From a technical perspective, we’re now in a fragile zone.  The fundamental data is holding thus far.  So a bottom may have been put in on Christmas Eve 2018.  Typically you’ll get some kind of pull-back — or even a re-test — after the drop and bounce the markets have just experienced.  The key is where to measure from.

The low on Christmas Eve of last year is a pretty easy spot to peg on the charts.  From that point, we saw a v-bottom recovery up until today.  How high this initial bounce goes is yet to be determined.  As of last Friday, the SPX crossed above its 50-day moving average.  However, it’s still below it’s 100 and 200-day moving averages.

If a relatively typical 50-percent retracement were to occur at this point, we could measure between either the 50, 100, or 200-day moving average back to Christmas Eve.  Doing this, we get either 2554, 2548, or 2495.  We can also toss 2516 in there based on last Friday’s close.  That’s anywhere from a 4.3-to-6.5 percent pull-back from Friday’s close.

What happens if support fails at these levels?  Well, it gets tricky.  There’s sort of a last-resort number at 2480.  But if that level gets violated, we’re looking at 2408 or a full-blow re-test of the Christmas Eve lows.  We do not want to discuss the outcome if the markets hit a lower low.  Let’s just say we could be partying like it’s 1999…  or maybe 2150.

What happens if we don’t get a pull-back at all?  Outcome unclear.

If there is no pull-back, presumably it’s because we’ve seen a material shift in expectations for the economy.  As of now, people are on the look-out for recessionary signals.  So anything that pushes that probability farther out into the future would be greeted as good news to this markets.  And we could see a drive even further towards the 2825-2884 range — or perhaps significantly higher.

So enjoy the January effect.  But before you get too excited about the possibility of a market melt-up, let’s all take a deep breath and see if we can breach the 200-day moving average and close above this level for a couple weeks.  That would be a strong signal that the Christmas hangover was behind us.  Until such time, we’re not out of the woods on this thing yet.

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION

Please remember that past performance may not be indicative of future results. Different
types of investments involve varying degrees of risk, and there can be no assurance
that the future performance of any specific investment, investment strategy, or product
(including the investments and/or investment strategies recommended or undertaken by
BigFoot), or any non-investment related content, made reference to directly or indirectly
in this blog will be profitable, equal any corresponding indicated historical performance
level(s), be suitable for your portfolio or individual situation, or prove successful. Due
to various factors, including changing market conditions and/or applicable laws, the
content may no longer be reflective of current opinions or positions. Moreover, you
should not assume that any discussion or information contained in this blog serves as the
receipt of, or as a substitute for, personalized investment advice from BigFoot. To the
extent that a reader has any questions regarding the applicability of any specific issue
discussed above to his/her individual situation, he/she is encouraged to consult with the
professional advisor of his/her choosing. BigFoot is neither a law firm nor a certified
public accounting firm and no portion of the blog content should be construed as legal
or accounting advice. A copy of the BigFoot’s current written disclosure statement
discussing our advisory services and fees is available for review upon request.

 

New Year’s Shift

Happy New Year!

This is the first full week of trading for the year – so back to work!

Markets are trying to shake off the December 2018 hangover. Last week’s first trading week sure made it interesting. The big news was the blowout jobs report last Friday coupled with the more Dovish tones from the Fed. This cocktail was the recipe for a huge rally on Friday.

Has this changed anything? Only the short-term outlook. It seems everyone had written off the economy for dead in December. With the Fed tightening, it was only a matter of time before the recession word came into play. But then the jobs numbers came out.

Realistically, the problems are unchanged from last year. The difference is outlook on the Fed. If the money supply isn’t going to be choked off even more aggressively (because, remember, they’re still reducing their balance sheet and no longer buying bonds), perhaps the economy can continue to grow.

Plus the American public is about to get a very real look at whether or not they will experience personal tax savings under this new plan. It’s been a popular target because of growing deficits at the Federal level, but folks are about to get a direct taste of ‘what’s in it for me.’

Some good news on China talks, the Federal government starts operating again (this is less of a concern to the market than the media would have you believe), and some decent earnings numbers and guidance in Q1 and this market could be back on track in short order.

The Fed shifts to more hawkish, trade talks with China drag on with no change, or we start to see numbers indicating an actual economic slowdown, and this market could head south all over again.

So for now, we wait a couple weeks and see how the data shapes up.

If you want to be a stickler, the SPX actually hit a 20% drop from peak-to-trough during December. So one could argue we’ve had the shortest bear market we’ve ever seen. Strangely, no one seems to be saying that. The talking heads keep talking about when the bull will die… so apparently an intra-day swing, or a one-day blip, isn’t how they want to measure things.

For the week, it look for 2408 support, and really no upside resistance to speak of, so 2575/2600. If this seems like a comically large range for a technical call… it is. But that’s what happens when you’ve had the kind of volatility that wrapped up last year. Things get blown-out, over-sold, and the algo’s get a little wild. Until volatility subsides (if), this may be typical for a while.

Cheers and fingers crossed for a great 2019!

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION

Please remember that past performance may not be indicative of future results. Different
types of investments involve varying degrees of risk, and there can be no assurance
that the future performance of any specific investment, investment strategy, or product
(including the investments and/or investment strategies recommended or undertaken by
BigFoot), or any non-investment related content, made reference to directly or indirectly
in this blog will be profitable, equal any corresponding indicated historical performance
level(s), be suitable for your portfolio or individual situation, or prove successful. Due
to various factors, including changing market conditions and/or applicable laws, the
content may no longer be reflective of current opinions or positions. Moreover, you
should not assume that any discussion or information contained in this blog serves as the
receipt of, or as a substitute for, personalized investment advice from BigFoot. To the
extent that a reader has any questions regarding the applicability of any specific issue
discussed above to his/her individual situation, he/she is encouraged to consult with the
professional advisor of his/her choosing. BigFoot is neither a law firm nor a certified
public accounting firm and no portion of the blog content should be construed as legal
or accounting advice. A copy of the BigFoot’s current written disclosure statement
discussing our advisory services and fees is available for review upon request.

2018 Lows in Sight

Looks like the stock markets made Santa’s naughty list. Last week seemed like things were stabilizing until the Friday afternoon selloff threw that idea out the window. At this point, sentiment is shot. It’s the end of the year. And the Fed has backed itself into a corner – damned if it does, damned if it doesn’t. Because, despite decent earnings and decent economic data, the perception is the economy is rolling over.

So it looks like the lows of 2018 may be revisited soon. Friday’s price action already pulled the major indexes back into correction territory. There’s just very little traction to be had. And unless Jay Powell pulls a rabbit out of his hat, there seems to be little for the market to get excited about this year.

Short of a formally inked trade deal with China, it appears the high for the year was put in back in October. And it appears the low for the year may yet to be seen.

For the week, look for continued volatility as the market searches for a low around 2532 intra-day. If the SPX breach of this level and you have to start looking into 2017-year for support levels… we’ll cross that bridge if (or perhaps when) we get to it. Judging from the futures markets, Monday will open lower. If the Fed-speak is wrong though, a 60-ish point decline for the week is more than possible.

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION

Please remember that past performance may not be indicative of future results. Different
types of investments involve varying degrees of risk, and there can be no assurance
that the future performance of any specific investment, investment strategy, or product
(including the investments and/or investment strategies recommended or undertaken by
BigFoot), or any non-investment related content, made reference to directly or indirectly
in this blog will be profitable, equal any corresponding indicated historical performance
level(s), be suitable for your portfolio or individual situation, or prove successful. Due
to various factors, including changing market conditions and/or applicable laws, the
content may no longer be reflective of current opinions or positions. Moreover, you
should not assume that any discussion or information contained in this blog serves as the
receipt of, or as a substitute for, personalized investment advice from BigFoot. To the
extent that a reader has any questions regarding the applicability of any specific issue
discussed above to his/her individual situation, he/she is encouraged to consult with the
professional advisor of his/her choosing. BigFoot is neither a law firm nor a certified
public accounting firm and no portion of the blog content should be construed as legal
or accounting advice. A copy of the BigFoot’s current written disclosure statement
discussing our advisory services and fees is available for review upon request.

Retrenchment

Thank you Veterans.

And for the rest of us market jocks, what’s the scoop for the week?  Look for retrenchment above SPX 2750.  In fact, look for 2800 this week as markets seek to find footing.

While the 200-day moving average should form some support, futures trading has been eradic over the weekend.   At first, futures showed a higher open.  But things swung to the downside as Europe opened and oil prices pushed higher.

This kind of pricing behavior is not necessarily predictive of anything other than folks repositioning over the weekend.  And since the range for the repositioning was relatively narrow, it may simply be noise.  Given last week’s strong move higher — after a 10% correction for most indexes — and a ‘nearly’ completed election — it looks like the markets are poised to start reclaiming some of their last ground from October.

One of the growing concerns is in the housing market.  Keep an eye on that in the coming months.  While stocks remain attractive relative to everything else, the housing market slow-down may be a sign that this almost-10-year economic expansion is feeling the affects of higher interest rates more than folks may care to admit.

It may sound funny, because mortgage rates in the 5’s are still historically low.  But, compared to mortgage rates in the 3’s, they’re some 30% higher than they used to be.  For folks that have never known higher borrowing costs in their lives (save credit cards), this could be a legitimate point of contention.

As a housing market aside, it’s going to be very interesting to follow what comes out of the massive forest first in California.  Not only has there been loss of life.  There’s been massive loss of property (which may actually be stimulative for the housing market).  There’s been massive strain on infrastructure.  And it’s called to the forefront some of the questionable Federal forest management policy that’s lead to these massive fires.  (Admittedly, this is something personal for me as the Pacific Northwest experiences fires every summer.  However, with only 4 million or so people in Oregon, there are not enough votes to seem to move the needle much in Washington.  But have this happen in California, and now we have your attention.)  Federal changes in forest management could potentially unlock a lot of value in timber.  If this were to happen, the housing markets would need to be reexamined.

Look for some early volatility this week as markets find their footing.  As long as the SPX stays above 1750 or so a recovery trend is still probable.  A close below this level and we’ll have to reconsider whether the Santa Clause rally is really coming to town.

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION

Please remember that past performance may not be indicative of future results. Different
types of investments involve varying degrees of risk, and there can be no assurance
that the future performance of any specific investment, investment strategy, or product
(including the investments and/or investment strategies recommended or undertaken by
BigFoot), or any non-investment related content, made reference to directly or indirectly
in this blog will be profitable, equal any corresponding indicated historical performance
level(s), be suitable for your portfolio or individual situation, or prove successful. Due
to various factors, including changing market conditions and/or applicable laws, the
content may no longer be reflective of current opinions or positions. Moreover, you
should not assume that any discussion or information contained in this blog serves as the
receipt of, or as a substitute for, personalized investment advice from BigFoot. To the
extent that a reader has any questions regarding the applicability of any specific issue
discussed above to his/her individual situation, he/she is encouraged to consult with the
professional advisor of his/her choosing. BigFoot is neither a law firm nor a certified
public accounting firm and no portion of the blog content should be construed as legal
or accounting advice. A copy of the BigFoot’s current written disclosure statement
discussing our advisory services and fees is available for review upon request.

Guess Week

Markets are yet to commit to anything from a technical perspective.  The SPX downtrend may extend toward 2532 (February’s SPX low), or it could rebound toward the 2800 resistance level.  That’s an election for you.  At this point, things are so tight we have little more than a guess to go on.

So for the week, hang on tight.  We could see anything.

Next week, we’ll get back to work.

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION

Please remember that past performance may not be indicative of future results. Different
types of investments involve varying degrees of risk, and there can be no assurance
that the future performance of any specific investment, investment strategy, or product
(including the investments and/or investment strategies recommended or undertaken by
BigFoot), or any non-investment related content, made reference to directly or indirectly
in this blog will be profitable, equal any corresponding indicated historical performance
level(s), be suitable for your portfolio or individual situation, or prove successful. Due
to various factors, including changing market conditions and/or applicable laws, the
content may no longer be reflective of current opinions or positions. Moreover, you
should not assume that any discussion or information contained in this blog serves as the
receipt of, or as a substitute for, personalized investment advice from BigFoot. To the
extent that a reader has any questions regarding the applicability of any specific issue
discussed above to his/her individual situation, he/she is encouraged to consult with the
professional advisor of his/her choosing. BigFoot is neither a law firm nor a certified
public accounting firm and no portion of the blog content should be construed as legal
or accounting advice. A copy of the BigFoot’s current written disclosure statement
discussing our advisory services and fees is available for review upon request.